navigating the waters of

Technology Transition

 
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Bringing the worlds of business and science together.

 
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Making Your Best Next Step

We help you organize your thoughts and efforts - to put your best foot forward.

There is an assumed disconnect between the world of science and the world of business. Often they operate in separate orbits - but they don’t have to. We have seen time and again that some of the best and most influential innovations in human history have occurred when those two worlds collided. The challenge? Getting everyone to the same table and speaking the same language.

No matter where you are, if you’ve been in business two months or 20 years, it’s worth evaluating how else your work can impact the world.

We bring a combination of scientific experience and sociological know-how that can help bridge the gap between varied innovation ecosystems. In short, we understand the mindset and motivations of the outside world and use it to help you better engage.

Whether you’re going for a new grant, thinking about a new business line, entering a new industry, or determining whether your technology has merit outside of the R&D environment, we are here to help.

Let’s explore the art of the possible.

 

 

Propelling your Business Forward

Our clients all have different goals for the future. We help them create custom solutions to their unique challenges. With expertise in R&D, internal operations of the engineering industry, business strategy, start-ups, and the federal government, we are the perfect partner who understands your industry, your limitations, and your potential. We can help you navigate the waters ahead.

 

Leadership

Kelli Kedis Ogborn

President and CEO

Kate Lucey Mace

VP of Language Science and Communications


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So what's with the name? 

H.S. Dracones comes from the Latin phrase Hic Sunt Dracones - which when translated means “Here be dragons.” The phrase refers to the ancient practice of using illustrations of dragons and sea monsters on maps to indicate unexplored or hazardous places. Legend has it that cartographers (perhaps those less fanciful or artistically inclined) began to write the phrase on such areas, rather than depicting the creatures themselves. While there is disagreement in the historical community regarding the prevalence of this practice, we embrace the symbolism. Our goal is to help our clients navigate uncharted territories of technology transition and slay any “dragons” that might be standing in their way.